SK2 - Slovak Ore Mountains: Hydrothermal mineralization and environmental impacts of mining

Leaders: Vratislav Hurai (Geological Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, geolvrah@savba.sk), Martin Chovan (Comenius University, Bratislava)

Practical information:
  • Duration: 3 days
  • Post-conference: 28.08.2010 Budapest - 30.08.2010 Budapest
  • Length: 880 km
  • Min. number of participants: 5
  • Max. number of participants: 40
  • Field trip registration fee
    • Student/young scientist: EUR 40
    • Normal: EUR 80
  • Accommodation and meals cost: EUR 70
  • Demands: Degree of physical demand is light to medium. Weather: warm (20–30 °C), rain possible; mines and caves: ~10 °C.
  • Means of transport: bus / van
  • Accommodation: Double room
    (for single possibilities contact Robert Hohol)
Full technical details in PDF format
Detailed itinerary in PDF format
Photo: Rožňava: the centre of the town, SK
Rožňava: the centre of the town, SK


Scientific focus (keywords): ore deposits; siderite-sulphide veins; Sb-Au veins, magnesite-talc deposits; ore mineralogy; environmental pollution; remediation; speleology (cave visit)

Photo: Collar of Anna-Agnes adit at Poproč prior to remediation (SK) Virtually continuous exploitation of a plethora of ore and non-metallic deposits has been taking place in the Slovak Ore Mountains from prehistoric times up to recently. The extensive mining culminated in the second half of 20th century and is now ceasing due to economic and environmental reasons. The field trip offers visits to the most important types of hydrothermal deposits exposed in underground mines and open pits: magnesite-talc (Hnúšťa, Jelšava) and siderite metasomatic deposits (Nižná Slaná, Rožňava area), metamorphic rhodonite-rhodochrosite ores (Čučma), siderite-barite-polymetallic veins, and quartz-stibnite veins (Zlatá Idka-Poproč). Apart from major economic minerals, the vein deposits are particularly famous for a plethora of minerals, which yielded important information about the origin of the ores and the tectonic development of the host rocks. The field trip includes also the visit of a UNESCO World Heritage Site - the aragonite cave near Ochtiná.
Collar of Anna-Agnes adit at Poproč prior to remediation (SK)


Daily programme:

Day 1 (28 Aug): Budapest - Salgótarján - Lučenec - Rimavská Sobota - Hnúšťa, Mútnik (Field stop 1): talc-magnesite deposit, dumps, processing plants - Hnúšťa: lunch - Jelšava (Field stop 2): magnesite deposit, open pit operations and processing plants - Ochtiná (Field stop 3): Ochtiná aragonite cave - Rožňava: accommodation (in Hotel Kras, 260 km)

Day 2 (29 Aug): Rožňava - Čučma (Field stop 4): mineralogy of abandoned dumps and tailings of stibnite deposits; (Field stop 5): mineralogy of stratiform Mn ores - Poproč (Field stop 6): dumps of Anna and Agneska adits, environmental aspects and remediation - lunch break - Krásnohorské Podhradie: Krásna Hôrka castle and mausoleum - Rožňava-Nadabula (Field stop 7): dumps of Bernardi and Stefan veins, mineral assemblage of siderite veins - Rožňava: return to accommodation (120 km)

Day 3 (30 Aug): Rožňava - Dobšiná - Spišská Nová Ves - Rudňany-Poráč (Field stop 8): open pit exploitation of siderite-barite ore, processing plants at Rudňany - Spišské Podhradie (Field stop 9): Sivá Brada, mineral springs and recent travertine precipitation - Spišské Podhradie: lunch, travel around Spiš Castle - Prešov - Košice: Mineral collection of East Slovakian Museum - Miskolc - Budapest (440 km)

On-line registration >>

Photo: Recent precipitation of travertine at Sivá Brada near Spišské Podhradie (SK)
Recent precipitation of travertine at Sivá Brada near Spišské Podhradie (SK)


Map of the field trip with the key locations (or download Kml file for Google Earth):


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