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June 20, 2010 Cancellation with 100% refund

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Recent updates

2010-08-23 IMA2010 Conference News
28/08/2010
27/08/2010
26/08/2010
25/08/2010
24/08/2010
23/08/2010
22/08/2010
2010-08-18 Lunches on IMA2010
Click here for detailed info
2010-08-17 Presentation submission available
If you would like to send your presentation prior to the meeting to Budapest, please send it by e-mail to Robert Hohol
2010-08-17 Please donate mineral, rock, and ore specimens to the Eötvös Museum of Natural History
Click here for detailed info
2010-08-17 Experience the quality of your samples with new course microscopes from Carl Zeiss
Click here for detailed info
2010-08-17 Detailed itinerary of field trips were posted
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2010-07-15 Optional Programmes information available on the website!
Click here for detailed info

Hungary and Budapest information

Hungary is a landlocked country of 93,030 km2 area in Central Europe, in the middle of the Carpathian Basin. It is bounded on the north by Slovakia; on the northeast by Ukraine; on the east by Romania; on the south by Serbia, Croatia, and Slovenia; and on the west by Austria. Plains and gentle hills of the Pannonian Basin dominate its surface. Some inselbergs form 600-900 m high mountain ranges. Temperate grasslands, agricultural land, meadows and non-coniferous forests characterise the landscape. Two major rivers: the Danube and the Tisza flow across the country from north to south. Lake Balaton, the biggest lake in Central Europe is a favourite target of tourists because of its warm water and nice landscape.

During its more than 1000 years of existence Hungary has experienced every possible historical ups and downs. It was several times invaded by different empires, occupied neighbouring areas, suffered several subdivisions, won battles and campaigns, lost world wars, survived civil wars and fallen revolutions. Since 2004 Hungary has been a member of the European Union.

Hungary has a slowly diminishing population of 10 million. The capital: Budapest is the most densely populated area with its 1.7 million inhabitants. Major cities of over 100,000 inhabitants are Debrecen, Miskolc, Szeged, Pécs, Győr, Nyíregyháza, Kecskemét and Székesfehérvár.

The dominant Hungarian (Magyar) population arrived from the east, from the Ural region. Its Finno-Ugric language and its traditional folklore is different from those of the surrounding Slavic, German and Romanian populations. Today's Hungary hosts ethnic minorities (altogether 10%) including Roma (Gipsies), Germans, Slovakians, Croatians, Serbs, Romanians etc. Nearly 3 millions Hungarians live outside Hungary as minorities, mostly in the immediate neighbourhood.

For facts and details see the Hungary portal of the government, the Fact Sheets on Hungary published by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Hungary in six languages, the CIA Factbook or the wikipedia article about Hungary.

From the wide range of travel and tourism information sites on Hungary see e.g. the official Hungary tourism site or the site of the Lonely Planet.

 

Briefly on Budapest

Budapest, the capital of Hungary, is an economic, financial and cultural centre with two million inhabitants. The city, known by many as the "Pearl of the Danube", is undoubtedly one of the most beautifully located capitals in the world. Budapest has a history dating back over 2000 years: there are ruins from the times of the Roman Empire as well as from the Middle Ages. Its main characteristics reflect the atmosphere of the end of the 19th century when the millennium of the Hungarian state was celebrated. It boasts a number of museums, theatres, concert halls, a lot of restaurants and other amenities. Due to the favourable geological setting of Budapest, there are more than 100 thermal springs and wells producing more than 30,000 m3 of thermal water supply to 12 medicinal baths. In recent years the UNESCO put several parts of the city on the World Heritage list. For more information about Budapest, you may wish to visit some of the links below:

Official home page of Budapest: http://english.budapest.hu/Engine.aspx

Official touristical web-site of Budapest: http://www.budapestinfo.hu/en/

Wikipedia site: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Budapest

Selected foreign web sites:

http://www.talkingcities.co.uk/budapest_pages/budap_main.htm

http://www.inyourpocket.com/hungary/budapest/en/

http://wikitravel.org/en/Budapest

 

Some practical information

Electricity

The electricity is 230 V, 50 Hz. Japanese, UK, USA and other visitors: please note that in Hungary Continental European German-style CEE7/4 sockets ("Schuko sockets") are used, which also accepts CEE7/16 "Europlugs".

 

Foreign exchange, banking facilities

The official national Hungarian currency is the Hungarian Forint (HUF). All the major credit cards are accepted in Hungary in places displaying the emblem at the entrance. Though Hungary is a member of the European Union, only a few shops and restaurants accept Euros (EUR) for payment. Currency exchange booths are available in Budapest at the airport terminals, railway stations, travel agencies, banks and various places in the city. The exchange rates applied may vary. Click here to see the actual official exchange rates. Traveller's cheques and convertible currency may be exchanged at these facilities. Major credit cards are usually accepted in most hotels, restaurants and certain shops in the city. Obtaining cash against ATM or credit cards is very easy from the ATM cash machines that can be found at almost each bank office, hotel or on the street.

 

Liability and insurance

The organisers cannot accept liability for any personal accidents, loss of belongings or damage to private property of participants and accompanying persons that may occur during the Congress. Participants are advised to make their own arrangements to obtain health, travel and property insurance before their departure to the IMA GM.

 

Public transport in Budapest

Public transport in Budapest is provided by Budapest Transport Ltd. (known to all Hungarians simply as BKV). Budapest has an efficient public transport network. In general the buses, trams and trolleybuses operate between 4.30 AM and 11 PM. All-night bus service operate on the major thoroughfares in the city (night bus timetables are posted at stops and in most metro stations). The three metro lines intersect at Deák Square in the centre of the town. Metros run at 2-15 minutes intervals from about 4.30 AM to 11.15 PM. There are also five suburban railway lines (HÉV) serving the outskirts of the city. For maps, timetables, ticket and pass information etc. see the home page of the BKV Ltd. (Budapest Transport Ltd.)

 

Shopping in Budapest (opening hours)

Food shops are open from 7 AM - 6 PM Mon - Fri, 8 AM - 1 PM Sat (but there are several larger stores open on Sunday morning and a number of small 24-hour shops). Other shops are open between 10 AM-6 PM Mon - Fri, 10 AM - 1 PM Sat. Most shopping centres are open 10 AM - 8 PM even on Sunday. Tesco is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Office hours: generally from 8 AM - 4 PM Mon - Fri.

Post offices: Mon - Fri: 8 AM - 6 PM, Sat: 8 AM - 1 PM

Banks: Mon - Thu: 8 AM - 3 PM, Fri: 8 AM - 1 PM.

Please note that 20th August (Friday) is a National Holiday when most shops (except for those at petrol stations and some small 24-hour shops) and the shopping centres are closed.

 

Taxis in Budapest

Budapest taxis have yellow number plates and a taxi sign in yellow. Any vehicle without these features is operating illegally. It's a good idea to avoid drivers who volunteer their services but don't have a registered taxi sticker on their car. This can prevent unpleasant surprises when it comes time to pay. All cars must have a taximeter installed, and these also print out a receipt. Taxi drivers are required to give an invoice on request. Tipping: in general 10% of the fare is acceptable. The total charge that has to be paid by the passenger is made up of three separate parts: the basic charge, which is irrespective of how far the journey is (presently maximum HUF 300 during the day, maximum HUF 420 at night), a per kilometre charge which depends on how many kilometres are covered during the journey (maximum HUF 240/km during the day, maximum HUF 336/km at night), and the waiting charge. It is worth calling a taxi by phone because most of the taxi companies charge lower rates in this case than in the case of hailing a taxi in the street. For further details see check this link.

 

Telephone

The international code for Hungary is 36, the area code for Budapest is 1. To call a number within Hungary, first dial 06. Budapest telephone numbers have seven digits, all other areas have six digits (in addition to the area codes). To make an international call from Hungary, first dial 00, then the country code followed by the area code and the subscriber's telephone number. Public telephones accept either coins (20, 50, and 100 HUF) or phone cards (available from tobacconists, newsagents, post offices, and petrol stations). To call a (Hungarian) mobile phone, from a public telephone first dial 06, followed by the subscriber's seven-digit number starting with 20-, 30- or 70-.

 

Important phone numbers

(English is usually spoken at the emergency numbers listed below. In case English is not spoken, dial 112)

Ambulance: 104

Fire brigade: 105

Police: 107

Central help number: 112

General enquiries: 197

Inland enquiries: 198

International enquiries: 199

Hungarian Automobile Club help number: 188

 

Time

Hungary is in the Central European Time Zone. In the summer months clocks are set at GMT + 2 hours.

 

Weather

The weather in Hungary in August is usually sunny and warm. Temperatures are usually in the range between 25 and 32 °C during the day. Check the weather forecast for Budapest at weather.yahoo.com, or at weather.com. For other regions of Hungary check weatherinhungary.com.